Installing the Foundation for 5G: FCC Indications Agreement to Streamline Small Cellular Deployments 888011000110888 With valid reason, tech observers have become increasingly excited about the innovative opportunities that next-generation wireless connectivity, also known as 5G, will certainly enable for schools, cars, virtual reality, robotics, medicine, the app economy, and more. It’s exciting stuff, yet we also have to recognize the important groundwork underway to get us there. The Commission has been forging ahead aggressively to ensure that the usa is the world’s 5G leader, putting particular emphasis on expanding access to range, enabling backhaul connections, and marketing infrastructure deployment. We took a critical step forward this week at the infrastructure front, when the Wireless Telecoms Bureau released an agreement among the FCC, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), and the National Meeting of State Historic Preservation Officials (NCSHPO). The agreement removes regulatory burdens for infrastructure deployments that will have little or no physical impact on their own respective sites. This change can make it much easier, quicker, and less expensive to deploy the facilities on which 5G is being built – like distributed antenna systems, small cellular material, and future technologies that haven’t yet left the drawing panel. The agreement will deliver an immediate and significant impact on 5G because, as Chairman Wheeler has explained, high-speed 5G service requires high-speed infrastructure application. But we’re not patting one another on the back and putting up our heels. To the contrary, we are open intended for business and actively looking for extra ways to bring further efficiencies to 5G infrastructure deployment. And we want to hear from you. If you’re a broadband consumer, or a tower company, or a Tribal Country, or a student, or anyone else with ideas about shrinking 5G application burdens, please let us know by contacting Jeffrey Steinberg, Deputy Chief, Competition and Infrastructure Policy Division, in (202) 418-0896 or Jeffrey. Steinberg@fcc. gov.

Aug 9, 2016 – 3: 47 pm

Jon Wilkins | Key, Wireless Telecommunications Bureau

With good reason, tech observers have become increasingly enthusiastic about the revolutionary…


No Responses to “Installing the Foundation for 5G: FCC Indications Agreement to Streamline Small Cellular Deployments 888011000110888 With valid reason, tech observers have become increasingly excited about the innovative opportunities that next-generation wireless connectivity, also known as 5G, will certainly enable for schools, cars, virtual reality, robotics, medicine, the app economy, and more. It’s exciting stuff, yet we also have to recognize the important groundwork underway to get us there. The Commission has been forging ahead aggressively to ensure that the usa is the world’s 5G leader, putting particular emphasis on expanding access to range, enabling backhaul connections, and marketing infrastructure deployment. We took a critical step forward this week at the infrastructure front, when the Wireless Telecoms Bureau released an agreement among the FCC, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), and the National Meeting of State Historic Preservation Officials (NCSHPO). The agreement removes regulatory burdens for infrastructure deployments that will have little or no physical impact on their own respective sites. This change can make it much easier, quicker, and less expensive to deploy the facilities on which 5G is being built – like distributed antenna systems, small cellular material, and future technologies that haven’t yet left the drawing panel. The agreement will deliver an immediate and significant impact on 5G because, as Chairman Wheeler has explained, high-speed 5G service requires high-speed infrastructure application. But we’re not patting one another on the back and putting up our heels. To the contrary, we are open intended for business and actively looking for extra ways to bring further efficiencies to 5G infrastructure deployment. And we want to hear from you. If you’re a broadband consumer, or a tower company, or a Tribal Country, or a student, or anyone else with ideas about shrinking 5G application burdens, please let us know by contacting Jeffrey Steinberg, Deputy Chief, Competition and Infrastructure Policy Division, in (202) 418-0896 or Jeffrey. Steinberg@fcc. gov.”




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